Tag Archives: Donald Trump

Farewell, James Marion Sims … And Hello, Kim Jong-un

When is it appropriate for us to engage in a public commemoration? Most would consider doing so when the honoree is a person, an event, or an idea that makes a permanent impact on society.

For instance, the Lincoln Memorial in Washington DC memorializes a suitable person. Local towns’ fireworks displays on Independence Day are worthy events. And the Statue of Liberty, in New York Harbor, is an exemplar of an appropriate idea.

But there are times when the progression of history modifies our perceptions about people, places, and ideas. When that occurs, permanent commemorations may become socially awkward, and may even be removed from view.

Consider, for example, last month’s decision by the City of New York to remove a statue of Dr. James Marion Sims from Central Park. The physician had been memorialized as the father of modern gynecology.

But there was a dark side to his fame. Prior to the American Civil War, Dr. Sims perfected his surgical skills by experimenting on human slaves without using anesthesia. In response to public protests, government officials in New York City decided to move the statue to his gravesite, and to present it in historical context there.

When the statue was first erected in the 1890s, Dr. Sims’ honorees could not anticipate the day when public opinion turned against his legacy. In other situations, though, the obsolescence of a commemoration is relatively foreseeable.

For instance, consider the commemorative coin that the White House of the United States recently issued in advance of a scheduled meeting between the American President Donald Trump and the North Korean leader Kim Jong-un. It portrays the two men in a head-to-head pose, and even refers to the latter as Supreme Leader.

Some commemorations, like the Sims statue, survive for more than a century. But the memorial coin immediately became a relic as soon as President Trump cancelled the meeting.

From large statues to small coins, our memorials are designed to remain in place forever. Nevertheless, their continuing presence is subject to changes in public opinion and the tides of history.

How AT&T Turned Its “Big Mistake” Into An Example Of Ethical Behavior

When was the last time you heard a corporate officer unequivocally acknowledge a serious error?

Did it occur after United Airlines instructed police officers to assault a passenger who declined to surrender his oversold airplane seat? CEO Oscar Munoz eventually expressed regret, but only after his firm “seemed to go on the offensive when it circulated a letter in which (it) appeared to blame (the passenger), saying he “defied” the officers …

What about BP’s declaration of contrition regarding its massive Gulf oil spill? Indeed, its Chairman Carl-Henric Svanberg did express sympathy for residents of the region, but he was later compelled to apologize for his self-described “clumsy” choice of words when he referred to Gulf residents as “small people.”

So it is downright refreshing to hear a corporation clearly and unambiguously acknowledge a major blunder. When such an acknowledgment is honestly proffered, we may be able to encourage such behavior in the future by simply recognizing its ethical value.

Consider, for instance, AT&T CEO Randall Stephenson’s recent comment that its consulting contract with President Trump’s personal attorney Michael Cohen was a “big mistake.” Shortly after the election of 2016, AT&T agreed to pay Cohen’s firm $50,000 per month for advice regarding a “wide range of issues.” One such issue was its battle with the federal government to approve its merger with Time Warner, a battle that rages on today.

Special counsel Robert Mueller is now reportedly inquiring about the appropriateness of AT&T’s motivation for signing the contract. How has the corporate giant responded?

Stephenson could have simply stated that he would not comment about the matter. Or he could have noted that the contract concluded at the end of 2017, and thus is no longer a current concern of his firm. Instead, the CEO candidly confessed that “There is no other way to say it – AT&T hiring Michael Cohen as a political consultant was a big mistake.

Was Stephenson’s behavior impeccable? No, not perfectly so. Instead of issuing his statement to the public, he included it in an internal company memorandum that was shown to the Reuters news service.

Nevertheless, if blunt and unvarnished honesty is an indicator of ethical behavior, then AT&T should be recognized for this example of appropriate action. Honesty is not always practiced throughout the corporate realm; thus, whenever we manage to find it, we should be willing to commend it.

NAFTA’s World Cup

After Presidential candidate Donald Trump repeatedly told the American people that the North American Free Trade Agreement is “the single worst trade deal ever approved in this country,” we might have presumed that it would be well on its way to extinction by now.

But guess what? NAFTA is alive! And it appears to be overwhelming all global competitors in a particular international endeavor.

That endeavor is the World Cup of global football, known as soccer in the United States. Apparently, the sport’s international governing body has placed its 2026 quadrennial championship tournament up for bid. And earlier this month, NAFTA partners Canada, Mexico, and the United States instantly became the overwhelming favorites to win the bid when they revealed their plan to jointly host the games.

So why is the soccer championship series such a popular target for NAFTA cooperation, when other economic targets — such as the automobile industry, for instance — generate such hostility between nations? One possible reason is that sovereign countries like the United States can easily produce quality automobiles without help from others, but cannot easily host World Cup tournaments on their own.

Naturally, critics may note that the United States did indeed host its own World Cup tournament more than two decades ago. But with the field of participating teams soon to expand to 48 competitors, many more host cities will be needed in 2026. And relatively few cities in the United States can match metropolises like Toronto, Vancouver and Mexico City for cosmopolitan glamour and passion for The Beautiful Game.

Is North America the only region where such an approach is beneficial? Could the bitter debates that now divide the European Union, for instance, be calmed by a pan-European World Cup? Perhaps any sporting event that is too large to be hosted by a single nation could help promote a spirit of globalism by adopting a multinational hosting strategy.

Unfortunately, it may be a very long time before the European Union can even consider such a venture. And thus, at the moment, the three nations of NAFTA possess a golden opportunity to lead the way.