Author Archives: Michael Kraten

Embracing This Milestone 500th Blog Post As An Opportunity For Transformation

Do you recall the zeitgeist of our society in January 2009? The global economy was collapsing, a Second Great Depression was threatening, and the first African American President in the history of the United States swept into office on the rhythms of Yes We Can.

At that moment, I realized that a business educator and management consultant with complementary Academic Qualifications (AQ) and Professional Qualifications (PQ) might be able to find something interesting to editorialize about on a weekly basis. And thus I launched the blog AQPQ.org.

Now, roughly 500 weeks later, I’ve achieved this 500th milestone post. How am I celebrating?

By deciding that it’s time for transformation.

Why? Because the world itself has been transformed during the past decade. A global economy in utter ruin in 2009 is, by and large, in fairly robust shape today.

But what of the health of our society and natural environment? Sadly, they appear to be evolving in the opposite direction.

In the meantime, the structure of the internet has been transformed too. Consider, for instance, the world’s most popular web site platform WordPress. When I launched AQPQ in 2009, I selected it because of its singular focus on blog hosting.

But today, WordPress’ home page invites potential customers to “Build your beautiful site today. Everything you need for a website that works for you.” It barely mentions the word “blog.”

So I’ve decided to embrace this 500th post as an opportunity for transformation. I will conclude my utilization of the blog format to express my editorial views, and will shift my commentary to alternative publishing venues.

To be sure, I’ll continue to utilize this web site to describe my professional activities. Nevertheless, I’m ready to embrace an indisputable truth: a structure that provided a strong foundation for my editorial expression a decade ago may no longer represent an ideal venue for me today.

500 iterations of any endeavor is a good run. After 500 blog posts across a decade of global transformation, it’s the right time to embrace the future.

What Would Thomas Edison Say About GE’s Expulsion From The Dow?

In 1896, Dow Jones created an Industrial Average of the equity values of twelve corporations that dominated the American stock market. Thomas Edison’s company General Electric was one of those twelve firms.

The other eleven corporations are long gone from the Industrial Average. Some continue to operate as smaller entities. Others merged into larger firms. And others dissolved or were broken up by court order.

Only General Electric remained in the Industrial Average until, last week, S&P Dow Jones Indices decided to expel it. Apparently, GE can no longer be characterized as a dominant American corporation.

So what would Edison, the American entrepreneurial icon who founded GE, say about this downgrade? Ironically, he’d probably wonder how his firm managed to remain in the Industrial Average until now.

That’s because GE was founded by Edison by 1890 to serve as a holding company for a variety of his electricity-related business interests. A hodgepodge of lamps, motors, and other items were tossed together under the General Electric brand name.

Had Edison been alive today, he likely would’ve explained that he always expected his application product businesses to wax and wane over time. He’d then return to his New Jersey laboratory and roll up his sleeves, determined to invent the next generation of applications.

Edison understood that the capitalist process of destruction and innovation would ensure that no application product would be popular forever. He undoubtedly realized that, just as his electric lamps and motors replaced predecessor products that ran on kerosene and steam, his own inventions would eventually yield to more efficient and effective products.

In other words, Edison would’ve likely put aside the existing application products of General Electric, and would’ve turned his attention to the solar panels and wind turbines of the future. And, while doing so, he would’ve relished the opportunity to build a better company than today’s GE.

Why You Should Care About Your Mobile Phone’s Location Tracker

Are you reading this blog post on your mobile telephone? If you’re doing so, you can now feel a little more secure about carrying it with you when you leave your home.

Why? Because the four major cell phone networks have decided to stop selling customer location data to third parties. They made this choice in response to the inappropriate corporate behavior of LocationSmart, a data aggregator.

How did LocationSmart mishandle location data? Unfortunately, the four carriers didn’t release detailed information regarding its actions. Nevertheless, LocationSmart’s web site highlights its sale of geofencing services.

A geofence is a virtual sensory field that surrounds a geographic location. When someone approaches the field, his mobile phone “pings” its location to the cellular network without notifying its owner. The data can be instantly communicated to a business that occupies the location, or packaged and then sold to third parties.

A relatively benign service might involve the text messaging of a price discount offer to a mobile phone in order to entice its owner to enter a store within the geofence. A potentially malignant service, though, might involve the compilation and sale of detailed personal profiles of cell phone owners.

The malignancy of a profiling service need not be intentional on the part of the data aggregator. Consider, for instance, the plight of an individual who frequently visits a grocer or restaurant that has recently opened in a building that also houses a cigar shop. A health insurer that purchases the data may (erroneously) flag the individual as a cigar smoker. The individual may never become aware of the sale of his location data, or of his health insurance classification.

The recent decision of the four cell phone networks removes one path to such an outcome. But if individuals continue to download and install applications without reading the fine print in their Terms and Conditions, they may provide data aggregators with new paths to the same undesirable outcome.