If Corporations Are People, Why Can’t Monkeys Be People?

It’s the Memorial Day weekend! As always, the holiday launches the summer vacation season in the United States.

It also marks the start of a heavy traffic period throughout America’s national park system. Throngs of citizens will drive their vehicles into forests, beaches, and other natural venues to enjoy the natural environment. And park rangers will struggle to protect the natural creatures from the massive invasive impact of tourists who come to visit them.

Earlier this year, People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) explored an innovative legal strategy to protect one such creature. It sued in an American court to protect the rights of a macaque (i.e. a monkey) named Naruto to own his own image.

Why was that approach so innovative? PETA claimed that Naruto possesses rights that are normally attributable to humans. It then proposed to appoint itself to serve as the “Next Friend,” or legal guardian, of the animal.

PETA lost the legal case. But might it consider filing an appeal? After all, non-human entities have been granted various human rights in the United States.

No less a figure than Presidential Candidate Mitt Romney, for instance, once created quite a stir by addressing the question of non-human rights. His declaration that “corporations are people, my friend,” was enthusiastically supported by his political allies and roundly denounced by his foes.

But if a legal business structure can be granted certain human rights, why not an intelligent animal? After all, humans and monkeys are both natural entities that are born of the Earth. We can hardly say as much about corporations!

This might be worth pondering as you enjoy the Great Outdoors during your Memorial Day travels. If you disrespect Mother Nature, its “Next Friend” may sue you!