Ford: From Mexico to China

Ever since Donald Trump declared his intention to seek the Presidency of the United States, he has heavily criticized American firms that manufacture products in Mexico. One of those firms, for instance, has been the Ford Motor Company.

His criticism began in earnest more than a year ago, when Ford announced its intention to shift production of the subcompact Focus automobile from Wayne, Michigan to a new plant in San Luis Potosi, Mexico. But shortly after the Presidential election, Ford announced that it would reinvest in the Wayne production facility.

That produced celebrations in the American workforce, but astute observers noted that Ford didn’t actually announce that Focus automobile production would revert to Wayne. Instead, the firm declared that it would produce the subcompact at Hermosillio, a different location in Mexico, and would shift other vehicle production to Wayne.

And last week, less than six months later, Ford changed its plans again. Now it plans to shift the production of the Focus to China.

China? Whoa! The United States economy would undoubtedly be much better off with production of the Focus in Mexico, and not in China. After all, a Mexican final assembly factory would be sufficiently near the United States to purchase components from American suppliers.

And Mexican consumers, working in Mexican factories, are usually far more likely than Chinese consumers to purchase products that are manufactured in the United States. They’re also far more likely to use the online services of firms that are based in the U.S., considering that internet titans like Facebook and Google are banned from the Chinese mainland.

And what was President Trump’s response to Ford’s latest decision? Although he greeted Ford’s earlier decision by tweeting “Thank you to Ford for scrapping a new plant in Mexico …,” he hasn’t yet replied to the announcement of the shift to China.

Of course, it’s entirely possible that he might still comment on it. And it’s also quite possible that Ford will change its plans yet again.

But for the moment, it appears that Mexico’s loss is not the United States’ gain. It’s China’s gain, and thus the United States’ loss as well.