Energy Independence: The American Future

Last week, the International Energy Association (IEA) predicted that the global community is merely five years away from witnessing the emergence of a new leader in oil production. That can hardly be welcome news to Saudi Arabia, of course, the world’s largest oil producer at the present time, or to Russia, its longstanding runner up.

So which nation is preparing to accede to the throne? Is it Canada, with its fields of oil sands in the western province of Alberta? Or Brazil, with its newly discovered wealth of off-shore crude? Or perhaps China, Vietnam, or the Philippines, with their recent discoveries in the South China Sea?

To the surprise of many industry analysts, the IEA predicted that the United States will soon become the world’s greatest oil producer. In addition, the Association forecast that America will supply all of its domestic energy and become a net exporter no later than the year 2030.

Imagine, if you can, a world in which the United States no longer needs to import oil from the Middle East, from Venezuela, or from any other nation. An American economic super power with a stable, secure, inexpensive, and solely domestic source of energy? It could well guarantee the extension of Uncle Sam’s global dominance throughout the 21st century.

Envious Rivals

Of course, America continues to compete with a wide variety of rivals for economic dominance in global affairs. Nevertheless, none of its rivals can visualize a future of energy self-sufficiency.

China, for instance, is aggressively continuing to develop relationships with African nations in order to ensure future access to energy resources. And as a result of the Fukushima nuclear power disaster, Japan continues to struggle with its reluctant transition from nuclear power to alternative sources of energy.

Of all of the major global economic powers, Germany appears to have made the most progress thus far in transitioning from imported fossil fuels to domestic renewable energy sources. But its green energy projects continue to be plagued by massive operating costs that require significant government subsidies.

In contrast, the IEA noted that new discoveries of natural gas fields in shale rock within the United States will likely supplement its surging oil field capacities and convert America from an energy importer into a fuel exporter. The world’s largest economy, an energy exporter? For American corporations and consumers, it certainly represents an enviable future.

The Global Markets

Considering the current configuration of the global energy markets, though, it is important to note that an energy independent America would not be invulnerable to market disruptions in other nations. Indeed, the price of oil is established in the global market place, and it is influenced by factors that influence supply and demand around the world.

That has been true since the middle of the last century, when seven global companies — known as the Seven Sisters — seized control of the supply and the price of oil. Then, in 1960, effective control of supply and price began to shift towards the governments of oil producing nations when Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Saudi Arabia, and Venezuela formed the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC).

OPEC certainly does not exert full control over all global oil prices; West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil, for instance, is traded as a commodity on the Chicago Mercantile Exchange (CME). Nevertheless, because traders and other investors can buy and sell most of the varieties of oil (as well as futures and other derivatives) that are produced around the world, the market price of oil that is both produced and consumed in the United States is affected by industry events elsewhere.

The Isolation Option

The past few years have been markedly turbulent ones for the global economy, of course, with once-reliable market pricing mechanisms struggling to adapt to new conditions. Might an energy-independent America be tempted to withdraw its oil and gas resources from the global markets and isolate itself from the price effects of external supply disruptions?

The scenario is not an implausible one. After all, domestic energy producers in the United States are already prohibited by law from selling large amounts of oil and gas resources to customers overseas. And conservative Republican politicians such as Ron Paul have long advocated for the dismantling of global market institutions such as the Federal Reserve Bank of the United States.

Likewise, many global financial analysts believe that the monetary zone of the European Union is destined to splinter because of centrifugal forces that are pulling apart nations like Germany and Greece. If the world’s financial markets fracture into national entities, the world’s energy markets may do so as well.

Would an American economy with a self-sufficient energy supply and a domestically controlled market mechanism be able to survive on its own? Conversely, would the rest of the global economy be able to survive without it?

These may represent mere rhetorical questions at the present time. In the near future, though, they may become immensely important policy issues.